Bob Dylan

Episode 234: Leonard Cohen - You Want It Darker

Episode 234: Leonard Cohen - You Want It Darker

Bob Dylan has won a Nobel Prize for Literature. This naturally has blown Patrick's mind.

Another legendary poet/songwriter, Leonard Cohen is back with, You Want It Darker, his  self-proclaimed final album. We're digging into Cohen's latest tome, exploring the legacy that he's leaving behind, and more.

PLUS! Guitarist Daniel Bachman has a new self-titled album, and we've got your first taste of his latest instrumental goodness.


The List for 7/1/16 : John Carpenter, the master...musician

Things to put in your ears

Many people know John Carpenter as the director of such classic films as Halloween,The Thing, and Big Trouble in Little China. However, currently Carpenter is touring the country (he makes a stop at the Lincoln Theatre in Washington, DC on 7/12), to showcase his equally influential musical work. Today's list includes some of Carpenter's best compositions for film, selections from his recent Lost Themes albums, and compositions inspired by, or in conversation with, Carpenter's work. So, enjoy The List for now and go see the master himself if he's coming to your town.

Things to do with yourself/others

It's a holiday weekend here in DC and outside of watching things go BOOOOOOM there's some slim pickings, but here's our bets for the best way to spend your precious time.

Friday 7/1

  • Flag at the Black Cat
    DC is a town that loooves it's punk rock. These guys (Keith Morris, Chuck Dukowski, Bill Stevenson, Dez Cadena and Stephen Egerton) are some of the true originals. It doesn't get any louder than this

Sunday 7/3

Tuesday 7/5

Thursday July 7

 

 

 


Episode 164: Thao & The Get Down Stay Down - A Man Alive

Episode 164: Thao & The Get Down Stay Down - A Man Alive

Bob Dylan hands over his archives  and one of our crew squeeeeeeeeeees with joy.

Thao Nguyen, her Get Down Stay Down, and Merrill Garbus have made a career defining, motherf@$%er of a record. That's pretty much it if you wanna cut to the chase.

You crave metal? We've GOT metal. From Finland. Put Oranssi Pazuzu in your putki and smoke it. 

RIP George Martin because GEORGE MARTIN. ;(


WIN STUFF: Win 2 tix to Americanarama Festival of Music at Merriweather Post Pavilion!

CONTEST CLOSED

We're sure you, like most of the ChunkyCrew, are dying to attend the Americanarama Festival of Music. Chances are the mini-festival's incredible bill doesn't need introduction, but here it is anyway - Bob freakin' Dylan, freakin' Wilco, and My Morning freakin' Jacket. But we've got one question...can you handle all the RAWK?! If you think you can, read on to find out how you can enter to win a pair of lawn tickets to the stellar, star-studded show at Merriweather Post Pavilion on July 23! 

As we all know, Bobby Dylan has aged quite a bit since his fresh-faced days playing Newport Folk Festival in '60's, but the legend is still going strong. Over fifty years into his career, at age seventy-one, the singer-songwriter released his thirty-fifth studio album, Tempest, in 2012. Although his unique voice is fading, music lovers and Dylan diehards continue to flock Dylan's live shows and soak up any new material the creative genius releases.


LIVE: Bob Dylan w/Mark Knopfler @ The Verizon Center - 11/21/12

Photo courtesy of John Buckley
There was massive outcry from Bob Dylan’s fans when during the 1965 Newport Folk Festival he enlisted Mike Bloomfield of the Paul Butterfield Blues Band to play electric guitar. Dylan himself “plugged in” not long after, and even though it led to two of the greatest records of all time (Highway 61 Revisited and Blonde on Blonde) fans decried Dylan’s switch from acoustic to electric, even though the writing had been on the wall for some time.

Causing less of an uproar, apparently, is Dylan’s fairly recent decision to abandon guitar altogether. Not once during his 90 minute set at Verizon Center on Tuesday did he strum a guitar, sticking primarily to piano and occasionally blowing his harmonica. His formidable harmonica playing was the closest he got to sounding like “old” Dylan, as his voice, which was the focus of so many reviews of his most recent album, Tempest, often seemed to fail him in concert as much as it does on the album.

Which isn’t to say his performance was bad – even after 50 years of performing, Dylan still seems to enjoy himself, even though he rarely acknowledges he’s performing in front of an actual audience. His band was stellar, old songs are reworked in both good and bad ways, his vocal flourishes – such as adding the occasional “how ‘bout that” and “I’ll tell ya” to lyrics everyone knows – bring a smile, and the riverboat gambler appearance he’s cultivated since the late 90s (wide-brimmed hat, bolo tie, pants with a flaming red stripe down the side) make him look like the legend he is.


Episode 15: No Pantses Required

In which the gang takes a trip to late night radio, pants become an optional accessory and the winner of the Bob Dylan growl-alike contest is finally announced. PLUS!!! Discussion of new music from David Byrne and St. Vincent, The XX, David Wax Museum and some guy that goes by the name of Zimmerman. 

Episode 15: No Pantses Required"






REVIEWED

Bob Dylan
Tempest

Spotify

  • Kevin:
  • Andre:
  • Carrie:
  • Justin:
  • STREAM IT
  • PASS
  • PASS
  • PASS
  • The XX
    Coexist

    Rdio | Spotify

  • Kevin:
  • Andre:
  • Carrie:
  • Justin:
  • BUY
  • PASS
  • STREAM IT
  • STREAM IT
  • David Byrne & St. Vincent
    Love This Giant

    Rdio | Spotify

  • Kevin:
  • Andre:
  • Carrie:
  • Justin:
  • PASS
  • STREAM IT
  • PASS
  • STREAM IT
  • David Wax Museum
    Knock Knock Get Up

    Spotify

  • Kevin:
  • Andre:
  • Carrie:
  • Justin:
  • BUY IT
  • BUY IT
  • BUY IT
  • BUY IT

  • REVIEW: Bob Dylan - Tempest

    These days, new Bob Dylan records are often compared to his material from 1997 or later. The album he released that year, Time Out of Mind, was hailed as yet another Dylan comeback and another in a long line of his chosen identities, this one the journeyman musician who could still write and record a spectacular song, and who was well aware of his fame but also his own mortality (“it’s not dark yet, but it’s getting there”). The Dylan of the 60’s was in there somewhere, but after telling us that he “used to care, but things have changed,” it was time to for a new scale on which to judge his music.

    Since then, it’s been a 15-year streak that has been remarkably consistent. Listen to any of his four previous albums (not including his highly tongue-in-cheek 2009 Christmas album) and you’ll hear songs that have remarkably simple construction – verse/chorus/verse/repeat 4-30 times – mixed with his increasingly simple yet still playful lyrics and a voice that gets more gravelly every year. Any one song on these post-1997 records would fit perfectly on the others. That’s not to say there aren’t standouts; “Mississippi” on Love and Theft and “Workingman’s Blues #2” on Modern Times rank among the best Dylan has ever recorded.

    All of this is to say the bar is set high for Dylan’s 35th studio album, Tempest, and sadly, it falls short. It’s certainly an ambitious project – five of the 10 songs are over seven minutes, and one is nearly 14 – but there is no cohesion between the songs, nor is there a standout track.