Bob Mould

Episode 406: Cass McCombs's 'Tip Of The Sphere'

Episode 406: Cass McCombs's 'Tip Of The Sphere'

On his latest release Tip Of The Sphere, songwriter/man of mystery Cass McCombs is embracing spontaneity and delivering one of his most vibrant sets of songs to date. Recorded relatively quickly at Figure 8 Studios in Brooklyn, Sphere captures the looseness of his collaboration with The Skiffle Players (and associations with members of the Grateful Dead) and breathes new life into McComb’s trademark wit and incisive commentary on the world today.

On the latest episode of Discologist, we’re reviewing this newest slice of weird Americana PLUS spinning a new track from trippy up-and-comers Garcia Peoples!


Episode 405: Bob Mould's 'Sunshine Rock'

Episode 405: Bob Mould's 'Sunshine Rock'

Bob Mould is one of the pioneers of indie rock, and on his latest LP Sunshine Rock, he’s looking back to better times and making one of the best albums of his careers in the process. Guest PJ Sykes joins us to discuss why the album is an essential ray of light in these dark times, how to learn to love an icon, and much more!


Best of 2016: Paul's Take

Best of 2016: Paul's Take

Whatever you want to say about 2016 (and we’ve said plenty), it was a great year for music and Chunky Glasses covered the hell out of it. Well, it was a great year for musical output at least. We lost far too many of our favorite artists but, by fortune or design, we gained some truly extraordinary albums before they passed. More than that, those that remained took up the mantles of the fallen to produce a bounty of sharply observed, deeply felt works. To call it a changing of the guard would be overly simplistic; an artificial narrative created to instill some sense of order on a chaotic year. But, be that as it may, it appears that as the world lurches into an uncertain 2017, at least we’ll still have plenty of exemplary musicians to help us make sense of whatever happens next.


Episode 181: Bob Mould - Patch The Sky

Episode 181: Bob Mould - Patch The Sky

Is the Rock and Roll Hall Of Fame an institution that's past it's prime. At this year's ceremony Steve Miller certainly seemed to think so.

Legendary rock icon Bob Mould is back with his latest collection of rockers Patch The Sky. Need we say more?

Detroit based producer and MC Black Milk (Curtis Cross) and his band Nat Turner are back with The Rebellion Sessions. We've got a taste of these tasty jams to wet your appetite.

RIP Above The Bayou. Long live Above The Bayou!


Bob Mould @ 9:30 Club - 4/27/16

Bob Mould @ 9:30 Club - 4/27/16

Bob Mould has been a mainstay of the punk and indie rock scenes for several decades now, having put out a consistently steady stream of new music since Hüsker Dü’s first album in 1982, Land Speed Record, crammed 17 songs into 26½ minutes. Although much of the world associates him with the Minneapolis, MN scene that Hüsker Dü came out of, Mould spent a decade living in the District before moving to San Francisco a few years ago, making any show that he plays here now like a homecoming. On Wednesday night, he made a return to the 9:30 Club, where he had DJed a frequent dance night called Blowoff for much of his time in the area, in support of his 12th solo album, Patch the Sky.


BEST OF 2012: Paul's Picks

10

Bob Mould - Silver Age

Best Tracks: Silver Age, The Descent

One of the true elder statesmen of rock, Bob Mould still knows how to turn out a kick ass album.  A pure blast of 90s tinged grunge/alt rock free from irony or nostalgia, Silver Age could have come out two decades ago and sounded right at home.  Fortunately for the music buying public, Bob was busy with Sugar back then and waited until this moment (when we really need it) to drop this impressive set of great guitar tracks on us all.  Put on your flannel, crank up the cd player, and enjoy.

 

9

Screaming Females - Ugly

Best Tracks: Doom 84, Red Hand

Holy hell does this album shred.  Marissa Paternoster has always had a way with a guitar (and by that, I mean she throttles her axe and aggressively squeezes every last ounce of sound out of the thing) and a great voice.  But on Ugly, she and the rest of the band graduated from the enjoyable if somewhat simplistic punk stylings of their earlier albums to produce a full throated beast of a guitar rock album.  From the stripped down nastiness of “Red Hand” and “It All Means Nothing” to the 7 and a half minute epic “Doom 84,” the album is perfect for any time you are in the mood for some old fashioned, grunge and punk inflected guitar rock. 

Unfortunately, Marissa has taken ill and has had to stop touring.  Here’s hoping she gets well and gets back to the concert circuit soon.

 


Best Of 2012: Justin's Picks

10

First Aid Kit – The Lion's Roar

The Soderberg sisters have grown up in a hurry and keep getting better. This alternately beautiful and haunting album doesn’t have a weak spot on it, and a guest appearance by the Felice Brothers (among many others) makes for a fun ending.

 

9

Dent May - Do Things

The album we all wish the Beach Boys had released this year, Do Things was the best album of the summer and, it turns out, one of the most fun records of the year.

 


ROCKTOBER 2012: 2015 - Don't Worry...Bob Mould's GOT THIS

EDITOR'S NOTE: All month long we’ve travelled back in time to take a look at the music of years gone by. For the most part one trend has been clear: The more things have changed the more they have stayed the same. One look at the charts will tell you that what is selling in any given year very rarely lines up with what was making waves. In fact it wasn’t until the grunge explosion of the 90’s that there was even semblance of confluence between the two. And while that tide may have retreated back down the musical shore, in 2012 we find it ever so steadily creeping forward once again. Are we headed for the next big music singularity, or are we doomed to repeat the endless cycle? Nobody can tell for sure, but in this, our final entry into our year-by-year Rocktober coverage we take a look into our crystal ball and check in on December 31, 2015 to see what the heck is going on in the world…


While the biggest local stories of 2015 were Japandroids’ two consecutive sold-out shows at FedEx Field and former NPR intern Emily White taking a job as director of marketing for Dischord Records, the music industry enjoyed the usual dizzying highs and terrifying lows in 2015. A review of some of the highlights:

  • Animal Collective releases an album of dolphin noises and sound effects culled from the Atari 2600 game “Pitfall.” It gets five stars from Rolling Stone and sells more than two million copies.
  • A masked man threatening to detonate a small handheld device on a Green Line train is disarmed and killed by former Husker Du front man Bob Mould. Asked for comment, Mould says “just doin’ my duty.”
  • Taking a cue from the lucrative success of John Lydon’s butter commercials, Robert Smith begins selling Purina Puppy Chow, Nick Cave becomes the spokesperson for Disney Theme Parks, and Trent Reznor appears in ads for Home Depot. Reznor also scores the soundtrack to the Wii U game New Super Mario Brothers Galaxy 8, Volume II.  
  • Music fans are elated and confused as Shakira, Beyonce, and A Place To Bury Strangers are selected to open the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.
  • Jack White astonishes fans and critics by writing a song with more than one riff.


REVIEW: Bob Mould - Silver Age

If you live in DC, you probably not only know Bob Mould’s music, you’ve probably passed him on the street at some point. But for uninitiated – and because it’s such a unique biography - let’s do a quick review of Mould’s career: He formed Husker Du, one of the most influential rock bands of all time. After they broke up, he pulled a 180 and released Workbook, a mostly-acoustic masterpiece in 1989, then reversed course again and made Black Sheets of Rain in 1990, an album that was perhaps harder and darker than anything Husker Du had done.

Three years later he formed Sugar, whose stellar record Copper Blue remains Mould’s best-selling album to date. He went solo again in 1996, before becoming a scriptwriter for WCW wrestling, then released several more solo albums with a more experimental electronic bent and, with Richard Morel, began DJing at the 9:30 Club under the name Blowoff. He wrote an autobiography, See A Little Light, which is widely regarded as one of the best music memoirs in recent memory. And, lest we forget, he wrote “Dog on Fire,” the theme song to the Daily Show.

All of this is to say that Mould’s new record, Silver Age, could have been anything from new age instrumentals to Nordic folk music and it wouldn’t have been surprising. What you might not have been expecting was a back-to-basics, balls-to-the-wall rock and roll record that’s a perfect combination of everything Mould does well; Husker Du’s aggression, Workbook’s stellar production, and Sugar’s wall of sound. It may, in fact, the best album of his post-Husker Du career.