Jeff Tweedy

Episode 447: Wilco's 'Ode To Joy'

Episode 447: Wilco's 'Ode To Joy'

2015’s Star Wars and its 2016 follow up Schmilco delivered a shot in the arm to one of indie-rock’s most lauded and revered acts: Wilco. Both were shaggier affairs then what had come before — 2011’s The Whole Love, while it had its moments, was a more near-miss-than-hit power-pop extravaganza. And both showed that, at least for Wilco, smaller albums necessarily meant better albums as the band pushed into its second decade with the current, and most stable lineup in Wilco’s history.

Enter Ode To Joy.


Episode 408: Wilco's 'Summerteeth' at 20

Episode 408: Wilco's 'Summerteeth' at 20

Twenty years ago, riding high off of the dual successes of their second album Being There and Billy Bragg collaboration Mermaid Ave, Wilco was still 2 years away from becoming one of the most revered band’s of their generation. Yankee Hotel Foxtrot would propel Jeff Tweedy and crew into the stratosphere, but it was on 1999’s Summerteeth that they truly found their voice. Experimental, lush, and heartbreaking to its core, Summerteeth is a record that captured the soul of Wilco like nothing they have created before or since. 

Tune in as guests Casey Rae and Eduardo Nunes join us in celebrating twenty years of the album that changed Wilco, and arguably modern music, forever.


Lil Uzi Vert @ The Anthem - 12/15/2017

Lil Uzi Vert @ The Anthem - 12/15/2017

For the past two years, Lil Uzi Vert has stood out as one of rap's brightest stars. The ascension from Soundcloud sensation to self-proclaimed "rock star" has been fast-tracked, powered by multiple mixtapes, two top ten Billboard singles ("XO TOUR Llif3" and "Bad and Boujee"), and a #1 debut album in Luv Is Rage 2 released in late August. The Philadelphia native took advantage of his momentum this year by kicking off his holiday tour A Very Uzi Christmas with 6,000 fans in attendance for the Anthem's first hip-hop concert.


NPR Music's 10th Anniversary Party @ 9:30 Club - 12/2/2017

NPR Music's 10th Anniversary Party @ 9:30 Club - 12/2/2017

Yes, NPR Music is only ten years old. Although All Songs Considered is going on 18 years strong, the coalition of NPR member stations from across the country was founded in 2007 to centralize the regional tastemakers that bring us shows like World Cafe or Jazz Night in America. It's hard to overstate its cultural influence on music in that short time, most notably with the Tiny Desk Concert video series, where up-and-comers like Diane Coffee and established arena acts like Adele come to perform. In the spirit of the brevity-focused music series, seven bands and musicians took to the stage to play three or four songs each. The event quickly sold out the day it went on sale. But the plot twist? NPR kept the lineup a secret until the moment they came on stage. Of course, when you're NPR Music, it's not hard to ask the public to place your trust in them.


Episode 325: If All I Was Was Black - Mavis Staples

Episode 325: If All I Was Was Black - Mavis Staples

Mavis Staples, one of the greatest voices of this generation, or any, is back with a powerful new LP If All I Was Was Black. Continuing in her collaboration with Wilco's Jeff Tweedy in the production chair, the civil-rights icon is going back to her Chicago blues roots and delivering a powerful statement on racism in America in 2017.

PLUS! Robert Ellis and Courtney Hartman have teamed up for an album celebrating the music of John Hartford, and the iconic first single is just as exquisite as you would expect.


"Myrna Lee" - Wilco

"Myrna Lee" - Wilco

Sounds Like:

Old(er) Wilco or Uncle Tupelo, a good, ol’ alt-country ballad.

Why You Should Care:

Wilco has had a long run, and the band now seems to be realizing its mortality with a glance down memory lane, announcing expanded reissues of their two earliest albums: AM (1995) and Being There (1996).

This twangy mountain song “Myrna Lee” is the first single they have chosen to unveil.  A previously unreleased track from AM, “Myrna Lee” has the feel of an Uncle Tupelo alt-country classic where the electric instruments take the background. With plaintive vocals, pedal steel, and buzzing fiddle, “Myrna Lee” was originally written by Wilco bassist John Stirratt for his twin sister Laurie, who released it through her band Blue Mountain’s 1997 album Homegrown.

Even as the band looks back to the early years, it’s hard to say if the end is in sight. For a band with such an extensive resume and side projects as Wilco, the question is always one of what we will hear next.

Both deluxe reissues of AM and Being There are set to appear on Rhino in December. Tracklists have already been released for both.


Episode 217: Wilco - Schmilco

Episode 217: Wilco - Schmilco

It's official, the headphone jack is no more...at least according to Apple. We're parsing the pro's and con's and abusing the word "dongle" excessively in the process.

WILCO'S BACK MOTHER F@#@ERS! But you knew that. 3 lifelong fans of the band weigh in on the alt-country fixture's latest, Schmilco.

The Flat Five (feat. Kelly Hogan) are from Chicago. The Flat Five are groovier than you, or anyone you know. We have proof. Put it in your ears.


Best Of 2014: Wilco - Alpha Mike Foxtrot: Rare Tracks 1994-2014

Best Of 2014: Wilco - Alpha Mike Foxtrot: Rare Tracks 1994-2014

Sounds Like:  

The Band had a baby with Television; Midwestern Radiohead

Why You Should Care:

So, an important person in your life likes Wilco. Should you buy this person Alpha Mike Foxtrot, the recently released set of B-sides and live cuts? The answer depends only on your loved one's level of Wilco fandom. The hardcore completists will have chased down these tracks on 90s alt-country compilations, soundtracks, and hard-to-find releases, and may, as a consequence, be underwhelmed by the lack of never-before-heard material. But even the most hardcore fan will find value in the high sound quality of the release, the live cuts, and Jeff Tweedy's track-by-track liner notes, replete with his trademark self-deprecation.


Episode 81: Tweedy - Sukierae

Episode 81: Tweedy - Sukierae

In our latest episode: We review the new album Sukierae from Tweedy. Wilco front-man Jeff Tweedy and his son Spencer may have the most appropriate band name ever, but does that familial familiarity translate to record? Is it nepotism, genius or somewhere in between?  PLUS! Rawk feuds, U2 proposes a new music format that will “save the industry” and snacks - oh so many snacks - on Episode 81 of ChunkyGlasses: The Podcast!


TRACKING: Bill Fay - "This World"

SOUNDS LIKE: Ray Davies, The Traveling Wilburys, English cool circa the early 70's
WHY YOU SHOULD CARE: Bill Fay is a one of musics lost legends and now he's back and brought a heart stoppingly gorgeous album with him. Need we say more? 

Bill Fay didn’t come by fame the quick and easy way. “He” as the saying goes “earned it.” In 1971, with just two albums under his belt, he was dumped from his label due to poor sales and for all intents and purposes disappeared off of the musical map for over 30 years. But gone doesn’t mean forgotten and over the years Fay’s music has been cited as being a major influence on artists like Nick Cave, Jim O’Rourke and Jeff Tweedy, to name a few. This week Fay finally returned to the spotlight with the release of Life Is People, an album 30 years in the making. Even without a label, Fay never stopped writing songs and as a result People is, in the truest sense, the fruit of a lifetime spent pursuing ones art.  

“This World”, the first single from the album, is exactly the type of perfectly crafted pop missive that fans have come to expect from Fay. A straightforward commentary on modern day life wrapped in a sugary coating of pure pop confection, “This World” sounds as vital as it does timeless and it’s just the tip of the iceberg of an album that come years end is going to be one that everyone is talking about.