Massachusetts

Patrick and Dave Go to Solid Sound 2015 - An Oral History Transcribed from Imaginary Basement Tapes… [Part 2 of 3]

Patrick and Dave Go to Solid Sound 2015 - An Oral History Transcribed from Imaginary Basement Tapes… [Part 2 of 3]

Two longtime Wilco fans and conscientious hedonists journeyed to Solid Sound 2015. One is a free-lance writer by trade and the other is a regular contributor to ChunkyGlasses. With a shared history of two previous Solid Sound Festivals, countless Wilco shows attended together, and a friendship built around their shared experience of love for the band, Dave and Patrick plan to describe all that is great about Solid Sound in a personal and experiential way. Think Chuck Klosterman at a Kiss festival. They will explore not only what they love about Wilco, but also why the band is important to them as they age, how their perspective has changed over time, and what it all means -- the Festival, the band, and life.

Their journey continues...


Krill - "Fresh Pond"

Krill - "Fresh Pond"

Sounds Like: Modest Mouse meets math rock

Why You Should Care: Another Exploding In Sound band that’s consistently putting out loud (read: great) stuff.

The world of concept EPs is a weird place, and Boston band Krill proves that on their recent five track release, Steve Hears Pile in Malden and Bursts into Tears, which is loosely about a dude named Steve who hears the band Pile in small town Massachusetts, and becomes increasingly forlorn that he’ll never make anything as good. 


REVIEW: Heather Maloney - Time & Pocket Change

Make no mistake; we’re HUGE music geeks here at ChunkyGlasses. But even the biggest music geeks can somehow miss something stunning and beautiful, which we did with Heather Maloney’s sophomore album Time & Pocket Change. We won’t hang our heads about it though; we’re too busy basking in the glow of an amazing artist who deserves considerably more attention than she’s currently getting.

Released in April 2011, Time & Pocket Change has been slowly garnering stellar reviews up and down the east coast. Maloney, a New Jersey native, is now based in western Massachusetts and as she tours more frequently from her home base, word of this incredible talent continues to spread. Her voice ranges from powerful yell to playful warble to melted-butter-smooth; her music runs the gamut from sparse and foreboding to crafty and – I’ll use the word again – playful. The songs call to mind any number of other singer-songwriters but she manages to beat them all at their own game; her straight pop songs are constructed better than those of Dar Williams, her introspective songs are more surrealistic and evocative than Kristin Hersh’s, and her creative flourishes (such as a jazzy trumpet on the title track) outshine and are considerably less contrived than those of Regina Spektor.