Noname

Episode 389: Noname's 'Room 25'

Episode 389: Noname's 'Room 25'

In 2016 Chicago rapper Noname (Fatimah Warner) stepped out of the shadows of her collaborators to deliver Telefone, one of the best albums of 2016, and easily one of the best hip-hop debuts in recent memory. One move to L.A. and a good bit of growing up later, Noname is BACK with her first “official” album, Room 25. Self-produced and self-released, Room 25 is an ambitious step forward for one of music’s brightest talents, and we’re joined by special guest Philip Basnight (Broke Royals) to discuss what makes it so great, and what we’re looking forward to from Noname in the future.

Plus! Washington, D.C.’s very own Dupont Brass is back with a new EP Halftime that’s all about enjoying yourself, and we’re spinning its first single.


Best of 2016: Kevin's Take

Best of 2016: Kevin's Take

One of my favorite quotes of all time can be attributed to one Hunter S. Thompson:

"When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro."
Fear and Loathing at the Superbowl, Rolling Stone #155

The simple wisdom of that rallying cry has driven myself and so many other creative people I know for as long as I can remember, but never so much as in 2016, because, let me tell ya: SHIT. GOT. WEIRD.

From the death of David Bowie right out of the gate right up to the potential death of our democracy and all of the outrageous pit-stops along the way, 2016 delivered chaos in a way that no other year has in my forty-four years of existence.

It also delivered music.

So much legitimately great music in fact that it's almost pointless to parse any of this into a list when all of it struck to the core of different parts of what makes us human, and did so in a way that we haven't seen before, and likely won't see again for years to come.

Would I trade any of this awesome for maybe a little less chaos? Not a chance. But man alive, do we have great GREAT music to chew on for the next few decades now.

So here you go. A little order to the chaos. It's ultimately as meaningless as anything else I suppose, but to me, these are the things that meant everything in 2016. 


Best of 2016: Paul's Take

Best of 2016: Paul's Take

Whatever you want to say about 2016 (and we’ve said plenty), it was a great year for music and Chunky Glasses covered the hell out of it. Well, it was a great year for musical output at least. We lost far too many of our favorite artists but, by fortune or design, we gained some truly extraordinary albums before they passed. More than that, those that remained took up the mantles of the fallen to produce a bounty of sharply observed, deeply felt works. To call it a changing of the guard would be overly simplistic; an artificial narrative created to instill some sense of order on a chaotic year. But, be that as it may, it appears that as the world lurches into an uncertain 2017, at least we’ll still have plenty of exemplary musicians to help us make sense of whatever happens next.


Episode 243: Best of 2016 - Part One

Episode 243: Best of 2016 - Part One

Despite, or maybe because of, everything going on in the world, 2016 has been one of the best years for music in recent memory.

Join us in the basement one  last time this year as we count down our favorites, feel out our disappointments, and more.


"VRY BLK" - Jamila Woods

"VRY BLK" - Jamila Woods

Sounds Like

Kehlani; Jhene Aiko; a proud declaration of being black wrapped in the sound of summer

Why You Should Care

Jamila Woods gained recognition singing the chorus of Donnie Trumpet & the Social Experiment’s song, “Sunday Candy”, but the Chicago-based singer/poet has just released her debut album of great R&B jams, entitled HEAVN, that should give her even more deserved attention. One of the standout tracks on the LP is “VRY BLK,” a song that is as clever in its wordplay as it is proudly defiant in the face of police brutality. Woods keeps Chicago in the mix, adding rapper Noname to the song for a breezy verse. As relevant as the lyrical content is today, the production values backing up her great voice makes this a quintessential summer song. But surprise - this summer jam actually has an important message.