Prince

Episode 418: Lizzo's 'Cuz I Love You'

Episode 418: Lizzo's 'Cuz I Love You'

On her third album and major label debut, Cuz I Love You, songwriter, multi-instrumentalist and liver of her best life Melissa Viviane Jefferson aka LIZZO is doubling down on the Prince vibes and in the process may be making the world a better place for us all. On this episode of Discologist special guest Philip Basnight joins us to discuss what makes a perfect pop album, the power of positivity, and why it’s Lizzo’s world now, we’re just lucky to be living in it.


The Revolution @ Fillmore Silver Spring - 10/26/2018

The Revolution @ Fillmore Silver Spring - 10/26/2018

Most stars aren’t born, they’re carefully crafted fiction. They matter only as a measure of distraction if the lie that got them there doesn’t result in some kind of long-lasting “good.” And Rock and Roll has seen its share of philistines and false prophets. But that wasn’t Prince. So when he died in 2017, there was a hole blown in the universe in the same place that was still only just filling in from the loss of David Bowie.


Episode 316.2: Aaron Abernathy - The Interview, Part Two

Episode 316.2: Aaron Abernathy - The Interview, Part Two

Aaron "Ab' Abernathy is a music man. He 's a soul man. He is a man of faith. The legacy of the Civil Rights Movement runs through his blood. And he poured all of this and more into the and album that is as much a soundtrack to 2017 as it is a timeless statement on flawed nature of the human condition, Dialogue. [Part 2/2]


Episode 316.1: Aaron Abernathy - The Interview, Part One

Episode 316.1: Aaron Abernathy - The Interview, Part One

Aaron "Ab' Abernathy is a music man. He 's a soul man. He is a man of faith. The legacy of the Civil Rights Movement runs through his blood. And he poured all of this and more into the and album that is as much a soundtrack to 2017 as it is a timeless statement on flawed nature of the human condition, Dialogue.


Episode 314: Dialogue - Aaron Abernathy

Episode 314: Dialogue - Aaron Abernathy

On 2016's Monologue, soul man Aaron Abernathy explored his journey from a boy to the man he is today. Abernathy had every intention of continuing that story in his next song cycle, but a funny thing happened on the way to that follow up: The world went crazy... and Abernathy began asking questions. LOTS of questions.

A spiritual heir to Marvin Gaye's What's Going On, Dialogue finds Abernathy looking at the world around him, and searching deep inside AND out for answers to the daily horrors that seem to have taken over the zeitgeist. What does it mean to be decent in a world that seemingly only rewards depravity? How can an African American survive in a society that continues to not just perpetrate, but ostensibly celebrates systemic white supremacy? Do even the smallest of human actions matter?

These questions and more provide the framework for that rarest of things, a true soul record that trades as much in heart as it does universal truth and meaning. Join Kevin, Marcus K. Dowling, and Eduardo in the basement as they have their own dialogue about the world today and one of the most relevant and powerful albums to date of this new American landscape.


Episode 282: Sign O' The Times - Prince [Discologist]

Episode 282: Sign O' The Times - Prince [Discologist]

Thirty years has passed since Prince dropped the strangest, most complex, and possibly best album of his career. A mash-up of Prince's past, present, and future, Sign O' The Times wasn't just Prince's boldest artistic statement to date, it was a game-changer for the artist AND the multitudes of artists that would (try to) follow in his footsteps for years to come.

Join Kevin, Marcus Dowling, Sarah Godfrey, and special guest Timothy Anne Burnside from the National Museum of African American History and Culture for a deep dive into what made this album so special and why its secrets, subtleties, and lessons are still being revealed and discovered to this day.


Episode 278: PODJAM with Naseem Khuri (Kingsley Flood) and Sam McCormally (Fellow Creatures)

Episode 278: PODJAM with Naseem Khuri (Kingsley Flood) and Sam McCormally (Fellow Creatures)

Stop me if you've heard this one before: A podcast host, production/songwriting wizard, and a socially-conscious Americana singer walk into a basement...

For our latest episode Sam McCormally (Fellow Creatures, Ugly Purple Sweater) and Naseem Khuri (Kingsley Flood) are joining Kevin in the basement to talk about the songs that hooked them on music for life and they're downing some whiskey in the process.

In other words: Strap in kids, cuz this is gonna be one amazing podjam.


Episode 159: Megadeth - Dystopia

Episode 159: Megadeth - Dystopia

Everyone knows the state of concert ticketing is f#$#ed. Now there's a new study that kinda proves it.

Megadeth is back with their 15th album, Dystopia. MOAR metal is good metal. Maybe.

Chicago's Numero Group continues to solidify their status as the grooviest record label that ever was with their Project 12 series. We've got a taste for ya.

Still kinda waiting for our damn croissant. 


Episode 123: Thundercat - The Beyond/Where the Giants Roam

Episode 123: Thundercat - The Beyond/Where the Giants Roam

In this week’s episode, we’re talking Apple Music, Prince, Foo Fighters and more! Apple Music launched this week to much fanfare…and then fairly immediate internet derision. Kevin has been testing it out and share’s his thoughts on its current state, and the verdict on if anything can really ever replace Rdio in his life. In other news, Washington City Paper fired a shot across the bow of crappy photo releases that concert photographers are often asked to sign by publishing the release for the Foo Fighters 4th of July blowout in DC. Is the outrage justified? Can we all just get along?

All of this PLUS Kevin and Paul pulling their best Statler and Waldorf on the new album from jazz bass master Thundercat, and a track from DC’s incredible The North Country taboot? Come on down for the basement, it’s time for your weekly dose of curmudgeonly love on Episode 123 of ChunkyGlasses: The Podcast!


Episode 116: Mikal Cronin - MCIII / Patrick Watson - Love Songs For Robots

Episode 116: Mikal Cronin - MCIII / Patrick Watson - Love Songs For Robots

This week on ye olde podcast we’re strong with indignation, curmudgeon, and wonder.  First up, Prince’s “surprise” show in Baltimore last Sunday was billed as a “Rally 4 Peace”, but with millions in potential monetary donations to be generated, and only a “portion” of the proceeds going to charity, should “good vibes” really count as currency? We resurrect our fan favorite “Prince is a dick” segment to investigate.

Next up, tune in as we review new records from power-pop wunderkind Mikal Cronin and Montreal’s masterful Patrick Watson.  Both albums are two of the mostly hotly anticipated albums of 2015, but do they deliver the goods?

PLUS!!! Are you a Dylan Fan? Ryan Adams? How about just a great song? If the answer is yes “The Jester and the Queen” by Chicago based singer/songwriter PM Buys is the track for you!


Episode 70: Purple Rain at 30

Episode 70: Purple Rain at 30

In June of 1984, a diminutive musician from the most unlikely of musical hotbeds started a revolution with the release of his magnum opus, Purple Rain. Part film, part soundtrack, part fiction, part autobiography, and all rock n’ roll, it didn’t just charge across racial divides to conquer the radio, box office AND the album charts, it shattered any notion that we had as a culture that there were limits to what we can create. Pulling from every conceivable style of music and sounding like none, Purple Rain wasn’t just the high water mark of Prince’s career; it was the purest expression of everything he’s done before, or since.

Thirty years after this landmark achievement, Kevin, Adam, Derek, and Marcus “gather(ed) here today” not just to “get through this thing called life,” but to try to figure out just what makes Purple Rain tick, discuss its impact on music today, share stories of growing up with such a grown up record, and more. 


Liv Warfield - "Why Do You Lie"

Liv Warfield - "Why Do You Lie"

Sounds Like: Sharon Jones if the Dap Kings were Living Color, with a kick ass horn section.

 Why You Should Care: Aren't you tired of R and B that has only been remotely influenced by human beings? Isn't it nice to have actual bands and actual horn sections instead of producer’s simply moving cursors around? More "people playing instruments and singing" and less "building soundscapes?”. It's been a long time since we've had a woman who is killing it instead of having the studio kill it for her...


Episode 26: The Return of the Thing


We're back! After a few months of hiatus and hijinks, we're bringing back all of the classic ChunkyGlasses Podcast EPICNESS that all 10 of our listeners couldn't live without. In this episode Robin Thicke gets sued, Thor rides and a jet ski, and Prince may still be a dick, but at least he's got a sense of humor. PLUS!!! We review new albums from Ty Segall and Diarrhea Planet!!

EPISODE 26: The Return of the Thing







ROCKTOBER 2012: 1989 - A Decade Redeems Itself

1989 was a year in which:

  • The Batman soundtrack spent six weeks in the #1 spot, even though there’s a reason why Simon Pegg isn’t the least bit hesitant to kill a zombie with that record in Shaun of the Dead.
  • Alannah Myles was popular for six minutes, and your girlfriend wouldn’t stop playing that fucking “Black Velvet” song.
  • Newsday published a story in which singer Charles Shaw contended he sang most of the vocals on the Milli Vanilli album All or Nothing. Newsday fails to ask why anyone would want credit for such a thing. Even though the story breaks in December, Milli Vanilli still wins the “Best New Artist” award at the Grammys the following February.
  • Tone Loc released the song “Wild Thing,” which promptly becomes the biggest selling single since “We Are the World.” Radio stations start thinking hey, we should maybe start playing that “rap” that all the kids are talking about.
  • Madonna divorced Sean Penn, giving everyone over the age of 14 hope that they had a chance. (Penn’s brother Michael fared better, releasing his debut album March.)
  • Mr. Mister split up, took their broken wings, and learned to fly again. Learned to live and love so free.
  • The Rolling Stones started their Steel Wheels tour, and the media wondered if they were too old to be viable – and that 23 years ago. One reviewer complained about the exorbitant price of the concert t-shirts: $20. The Stones start the tour with an impromptu show at a small club in New Haven, CT. Fewer than 700 people paid $3 to get in.
  • The biggest selling single of the year was “Look Away,” by Chicago. (It’s possible that every year in our Rocktober coverage has mentioned Chicago at least once; I’m just trying to keep up.)
  • Paul McCartney released a live album that was available only in the Soviet Union. People in the U.S. paid $1,000 for bootlegs instead of just waiting 10 years to illegally download it.


Oh. What.The.F@#K? Really 1989? REALLY

As mediocre as the last year of the decade was overall, every month except December managed to produce at least one album that had a significant impact on music. Let’s go through month-by-month and recall how you avoided OD’ing on Roxette, Debbie Gibson, and Technotronic.