R&B

Episode 375: Slaying The Hypebeast

Episode 375: Slaying The Hypebeast

HYPE has always been a part of the music/entertainment industry, but in 2018, have we gone too far? Increasingly, it's not enough anymore that an artist delivers a few great hooks. To succeed they have to be the greatest of all time, the savior of the music industry, or, even worse, the voice of a generation, all often without even having a single album under their belts.

On our latest episode, our friends Philip Basnight (Broke Royals) and Rafa (Rafa's One Man Band, Saduardo's actual brother) are joining us for a frank discussion about how we consume, market, share, and celebrate music in the modern era.


Episode 374: Constant Image - Flasher

Episode 374: Constant Image - Flasher

Washington, DC's Flasher made minor waves with their self-titled debut in 2016, and now the trio is back with a new label (Domino) and a fun-as-hell new LP, Constant Image. Recalling the late 80's heyday of gothic synthpop, Constant Image's outta time, place, and, most importantly, outta sight sound is the new hotness arriving just in time to save us all from another dreary Summer in the swamp.

PLUS! Ali Shaheed Muhammad & Adrian Younge's long-gestating project The Midnight Hour is finally out in the wild, and we've got a tasty track for you to turn the lights down lowwww and do whatever comes naturally for ya.


Episode 330: Abandoned Luncheonette - Daryl Hall & John Oates [Discologist]

Episode 330: Abandoned Luncheonette - Daryl Hall & John Oates [Discologist]

Before they were the mega-hit makers of the 80's, Daryl Hall & John Oates were just a couple of doods in love with soul and R&B on a mission to share it with the world. On their 1973 masterpiece Abandoned Luncheonette, their second album for Atlantic records, the duo were coming of off an underperforming debut (Whole Oates) and were desperately searching for their identity.

SPOILER ALERT: They found it. 

Sarah Godfrey and Marcus K. Dowling join Kevin in the basement to talk about an unmitigated classic that almost got lost in time...like we do. 


Episode 328: Best Of 2017

Episode 328: Best Of 2017

It's likely that we'll look back at 2017 as the year almost everything fell apart, downerism ruled the land, and we came very close to being broken as a people. 

But we didn't break. We made it. And on this final installment of ChunkyGlasses: The Podcast for 2017, we're discussing the music that lifted us up, dropped us down, and sometimes even showed us the way, but never, ever let us down.

Thanks for tuning in all year. We'll see you soon. Until then be good to your ears, but be better to your people...


Episode 322: Face Your Fear - Curtis Harding

Episode 322: Face Your Fear - Curtis Harding

Atlanta's Curtis Harding has been steeped in soul music his entire life. From singing in church with his family in Michigan as a child to being one of Cee Lo Green's star backup singers, Harding is a true veteran of the scene. On his second full length Face Your Fear, he's playing with is self-proclaimed "garage soul" formula again, this time enlisting the help of uber-producer Danger Mouse to drag a dying art form screaming into the future.

PLUS! Country is king even in Canada, and Blake Berglund is living proof! We've got a taste of his new album Realms for you to sidle your ears up to.


Episode 319: Take Me Apart - Kelela

Episode 319: Take Me Apart - Kelela

Washington, DC native, and second-generation Ethiopian American Kelela Mizanekristos spent years honing her musical chops in the underground scene of the nation's capital before moving to Las Angeles, dropping her last name and beginning her ascension to one of the most essential voices in R&B today.

On her acclaimed 2013 mixtape Cut 4 Me and 2015's Hallucinogen, the singer/producer made it clear that she was a force to be reckoned with. Now, on Take Me Apart, her first full length, she's building on some of the themes from her prior work to craft a vital statement about personhood, womanhood, and the perils and pitfalls of love.

Kevin and Marcus (Dowling) are sitting down to discuss one of 2017's most notable albums to find out if Kelela has got the goods, or just if the ideas she's exploring are ultimately more important than the execution.


Jamila Woods @ Songbyrd - 7/29/2017

Jamila Woods @ Songbyrd - 7/29/2017

Jamila Woods has an impressive resume: Brown University graduate, associate artistic director of the non-profit organization Young Chicago Authors, and rising R&B star. After making a name for herself singing the chorus of Donnie Trumpet & the Social Experiment’s “Sunday Candy” and Chance the Rapper’s “Blessings,” she released her debut album HEAVN exclusively on SoundCloud through Chicago label Closed Sessions. The album was so well-received that she has since signed to record label Jagjaguwar, who will be jointly re-releasing HEAVN alongside her original label Closed Sessions. With the impending re-release, she embarked on a July tour that included stops at Pitchfork Music Festival, Panorama Festival, and a sold-out DC crowd at Songbyrd.


Episode 251: Nothing Feels Natural - Priests

Episode 251: Nothing Feels Natural - Priests

After a string of EP's and years of anticipation, Washington DC neü-punk provocateurs, Priests, have finally delivered their debut full length, Nothing Feels Natural. On our latest podcast, Kevin, Paul, Eduardo and Marcus Dowling (Pitchfork, Bandcamp) are hanging out in the basement, getting to the bottom of this raucous new album. Is it the right protest album at the right time, or just another "punk" album for the masses? Tune in to find out.

PLUS! R&B jams from the underground! Sonder's new EP Into is laying down the bedroom vibes, and we've got it's lead track for you to sink your teeth into.


KING @ U Street Music Hall - 10/20/16

KING @ U Street Music Hall - 10/20/16

Nostalgia loves to rear its head in many ways. Scanning the current musical landscape, it becomes clear that the 80s and 90s have been in vogue. Although we are long removed from the years of TLC, Destiny’s Child, and Cameo, Los Angeles’s KING recalls such groups. The trio took the highly-receptive and nearly sold-out U Street Music Hall crowd on a nostalgia that perfectly emulated the sounds of bygone musical eras.