Texas

Episode 436: Mike and The Moonpies' 'Cheap Silver and Solid Country Gold'

Episode 436: Mike and The Moonpies' 'Cheap Silver and Solid Country Gold'

Austin, TX's Mike and The Moonpies have come a long way from playing the dancehalls of their native Texas. On their new LP, Cheap Silver and Solid Country Gold, the quintet is leaving the honky-tonk behind and exploring the sounds of smoothed out 70's Country with the help of their friends the London Philharmonic Orchestra. Recorded at the famed Abbey Road Studios, Cheap Silver is bringing countrypolitan "back" in a big way, and the results are a timeless listen that is also one of the years best.  


Episode 381: In Conversation with Motorcade

Episode 381: In Conversation with Motorcade

Hailing from Dallas, Texas, this group of rock and roll veterans (between them they've recorded and toured with the likes of St. Vincent, The Apples in Stereo, The War on Drugs, The Deathray Davies, Baboon, Daniel Johnston, and more) got together and decided to form "greatest band in the world. Maybe." and so it was that Motorcade was born. Armed with an ear for the past and a heart for writing great f@#@ing songs, Motorcade's debut defies expectations and is one of the best albums of 2018. 


Episode 336: Wide Open Spaces - Dixie Chicks

Episode 336: Wide Open Spaces - Dixie Chicks

Before they were country music's most "controversial" superstars, the Dixie Chicks ruled the charts with their savvy mix of bluegrass, country, and pop. On our latest episode, we're digging into the trios finest hour and the record that jump-started their career, 1998's iconic Wide Open Spaces. 

What was the legacy of this monster crossover hit on not just country music, but pop and rock? Why has endured as not only a classic, but a standard-bearer for excellence? Eduardo, Marcus, and Kevin are asking these questions and more as we dive deep into one of the biggest albums in country music history. 


Episode 315: On The Rocks - Midland

Episode 315: On The Rocks - Midland

If Country Music is king in 2017, then the gentlemen of Midland have got their eyes on the throne. Kevin and Marcus K. Dowling (Vice, Decades) are diving deep into the debut album from one of Nashville's latest, and greatest exports. They've got the song of the year ("Drinking Problem") but are Midland one-hit-wonders, or is there more to this band than the machine that they are a product of typically turns out.

PLUS: Positive No is BACK, and sounding better than ever. Hang out as we spin "Y.A.A.Y.Y.," their most excellent new single from their most excellent new album, Partners In The Wild!


Episode 266: Trophy - Sunny Sweeney

Episode 266: Trophy - Sunny Sweeney

Streaming radio mainstay Pandora has finally revealed their Spotify/Apple Music competitor. Built on the ashes of Rdio, and released well into these streaming wars, will Pandora Unlimited change the game or is it too little, too late? We've got some thoughts.

Sunny Sweeney has made some damn fine country music in her relatively short career. On her latest LP Trophy, she's walking the fine line between growing up and keeping her "bad girl" edge and the result is her strongest album yet. 

PLUS! Senders hail from VALHALLA..err...Boston, and features our good friend Casey Ray on vocal duties. Get ready to rock with a taste of their new self-titled LP.


Episode 193: Robert Ellis

Episode 193: Robert Ellis

With 2011's Photograph and 2014's The Lights From The Chemical Plant, Robert Ellis established himself as one best singer-songwriters working today. 

Robert Ellis, his third major release (and one of the best albums of 2016) builds on that foundation, but refuses to be constrained to any genre, country or otherwise. 

On a recent visit to Washington, DC, Robert stopped by the basement to talk about his new album, life on the road and how great songwriting beats all. 

You deserve this podcast. You earned it. 


Episode 73: Mother Falcon

Episode 73: Mother Falcon

Since 2008, the Austin, Texas collective known as MOTHER FALCON have been making rock, quite literally, the old fashioned way. With instrumentation that you’re more likely to see in a symphony orchestra or jazz quartet, the [currently] seventeen piece group turns out soaring, triumphant songs that challenge the notion of what “pop” can be as much as they fit comfortably into that tradition.

Recently the band staged a run of East coast shows and, several of the members stopped by the basement to talk about the history of the band, the challenges of touring with a small army of musicians, and the ambitious Summer Camp program launched in 2011 that teaches younger musicians the ins and outs of songwriting, arranging, and pretty much everything else you would want to know on how to “make it” in a band.


Episode 52: Eric Pulido of Midlake

Episode 52: Eric Pulido of Midlake

In this episode Andre and Kevin sit down with Midlake’s Eric Pulido before their recent gig opening for Neil Finn at the Lincoln in DC to talk about their new album Antiphon, the beginnings of the band, their recent split with front man Tim Smith, and more. PLUS! Kevin and Adam review the Afghan Whigs first new release in sixteen years, Do To The Beast. How does it measure up to classics like Gentleman and Black Love? Listen in and find out!


SXSW 2013..er..14: The Rules According To This Motherf$#ker

SXSW 2013..er..14: The Rules According To This Motherf$#ker

Words by guest contributor and general rawk GOD, Chris Smith

Editors Note: Over the years, the annual music industry summer camp known as SXSW has grown from the coolest little music conference that could, to a nigh full blown music festival headlined by the likes of...well everyone...at once. But while the years may have brought on an increase in scope and line size (oh the lines) there are a few simple truths that have remained universal. Truths that we are now proud to present to you by way of a man that's been there and back again...and again...and again. Unfiltered. Unedited. This is SXSW and how to survive it. 


TRACKING: ...And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead - "Catatonic"

 

SOUNDS LIKE: At The Drive-In, Sparta, Sonic Youth
WHY YOU SHOULD CARE: Austin punks return with a politically charged video for their menacing new single

Make your own assumptions as to whom Rich Dobney may or may not be a parody of, it could be any politican really, but it seems like he's probably not who he really claims to be.  Lighting stogies with money, having a rendezvous in the bathroom.. is this really what he should be doing instead of doing things that would be beneficial to the American people?

This happens to be the premise for the recently released clip for "Catatonic", the raging new single from Austin's ...And You Will Know Us By The Trail Of Dead.  As the lead single from their upcoming album Lost Songs, the one thing that isn't lost is their love of rock and roll. Anthemic guitars are amidst the equally anthemic shouts and screams of longtime members Conrad Keeley & Jason Reece.  Lost Songs, their 8th studio album (and no, it isn't a collection of outtakes), will be out October 23rd.


LIVE: Lyle Lovett and his Acoustic Group @ Wolf Trap - 8/12/12

Lyle Lovett fans got two shows for the price of one Tuesday night at Wolf Trap, as Lovett and His Acoustic Group essentially opened for themselves. Lovett spent the first half of the show playing some of his favorite songs from years past, most of which appear on his recent album, Release Me. The second half of his 30 song, 2.5 hour set featured many of his popular originals. Taken together, the halves made for a fantastic whole that alternated from rollicking country hoedown to tranquil folk retreat.

The Acoustic Group took the stage before Lovett, opening with a blistering rendition of the bluegrass standard “Garfield’s Blackberry Blossom.” Luke Bulla showed off his skills on the fiddle, while Keith Sewell’s fingers moved blindingly fast over his mandolin. Bassist Victor Krauss (brother of Alison), cellist John Hagen, and drummer Russ Kunkel created a magnificent backing sound that instantly made the crowd forget they weren’t seeing Lovett’s more famous Large Band. Lovett then joined his group (with backup singer Arnold McCuller) for a stellar version of the country classic “Release Me,” the title track to Lovett’s recent album. Next was “White Boy Lost in the Blues,” the Michael Franks number that Lovett said he first heard performed by Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee. Lovett told the audience that he related to the song, since as a young man in rural Texas he was in “desperate fear of not being funky enough.”


REVIEW: ZZ Top - Texicali

After a nine year absence from the airwaves, the bearded ones from the great state of Texas have returned and they’ve brought all of the weather and wear of that state's dusty roads with them. With uber-producer Rick Rubin at the helm, the 4 song EP Texacali is less a return to form for the trio than it is a shot across the bow of the modern crop of “blues rockers” who have attempted to lay claim to the throne that ZZ Top practically single handedly built.

The work they did from around 1983 to around 1987 produced some of the most iconic songs of not just the decade, but rock and roll period. Tracks like “Gimme All Your Lovin”, “Sleeping Bag”, “Sharp Dressed Man” and the absolutely unstoppable “Legs” very much defined what it meant to be cool for a generation of rockers. And while all of the hand signals, cars, synthesizers  and layers of new wave-ish production that were piled on still added up to the pinnacle of cool, stylistically speaking, it was arguably a space that the group had no need to explore or indulge. Pre Eliminator tracks like “Tush”, “I Thank You”, “Cheap Sunglasses”, and “Jesus Just Left Chicago” got by on their gritty cool and rattlesnake guitar tone.