singer songwriter

Episode 410: Jessica Pratt's 'Quiet Signs'

Episode 410: Jessica Pratt's 'Quiet Signs'

On her new LP Quiet Signs, Jessica Pratt continues to perfect her chilly yet hopeful update of English folk music, and her efforts – this was Pratt’s first album recorded in a proper studio – more than pay off. Quiet, contemplative, chilly, yet supremely comforting, Quiet Signs is Pratt at her very best.

On a new episode of Discologist, we’re discussing this unique artists latest, the future of folk in the modern era, much more.


Episode 403: Robert Ellis's 'Texas Piano Man'

Episode 403: Robert Ellis's 'Texas Piano Man'

If Robert Ellis’s self-titled 2016 album announced him to the world as a songwriting force to be reckoned with, then is new LP Texas Piano Man makes the case that he is the stuff of legend. Swapping his six strings for eighty-eight keys, Ellis’s latest finds him pairing his trademark gut-wrenching honesty and melodic sophistication with the panache of late 70’s pop rock (think Elton John and Leon Russel), and the result is undeniably the best album of his career.

Tune in to the this latest episode of Discologist as we dive deep into this rock and roll masterpiece and try to come back with some of it’s truth’s on the other side.


Episode 321: Turn Out The Lights - Julien Baker

Episode 321: Turn Out The Lights - Julien Baker

To say Julien Baker wears her heart on her sleeve would be an understatement. On Turn Out The Lights, the Memphis, Tennessee native (now based in Nashville) turns up the feels on an emotional roller coaster of an album that drags the listener down to the bottom and doesn't offer a clear way back from the depths.

Kevin, Eduardo, and Marcus are spending some time with this elegiac powerhouse of an album and considering the truth in "downerism" and if it's OK to feel oh-so-not-OK.

PLUS! Soul Man Gregory Porter is back and hitching a ride with Nat King Cole to make you "Smile" on his latest LP, Nat King Cole & Me.


Episode 124: Sara Curtin

Episode 124: Sara Curtin

This week on the podcast we’re talking to Washington, DC’s Sara Curtin! For years she’s been wowing audiences as one half of The Sweater Set, and more recently singing backup DC’s “supergroup” Justin Jones and the B-Sides, but now it’s time for Sara to stun on her own…again. Michigan Lilium, out July 24th, is Sara’s second solo album and in advance of her release show in New York City on July 17th, Kevin sat down with the illustrious singer/songwriter to talk about singing, family, cats, the DC scene, and, most importantly her fantastically adventurous and sublime new record.

Whether you’re just discovering Sara Curtin’s music or are a longtime fan, this is a chat you’re not going to want to miss on Episode 124 of ChunkyGlasses: The Podcast!


TO DO LIST: Peter Mulvey @ Jammin' Java TONIGHT!!!

Many musicians have written about getting “in the van” to head out on tour, and by and large they don’t make it sound like a pleasant experience. Perhaps they should roll out on a $3,500 German-made black HP Velotechnik Grasshopper foldable touring bike, as that’s Peter Mulvey’s choice of ride, and it sounds like he’s having a fun time. Traveling around the country on his bike, Mulvey is, in his own words, “turning American into a European Socialist dystopia one folksinger at a time.” He’ll ride his bike into town this evening and do his best to communize Jammin’ Java. (Alright, in point of fact he’s riding from Union Station, but still…)

Originally from Wisconsin, Mulvey spent time honing his skills in Boston subways (as did Tracy Chapman before him). He now has more than a dozen albums under this belt, ranging from contemporary folk to acoustic rock to an all-instrumental album with longtime collaborator David Goodrich.

On his latest album, The Good Stuff, Mulvey focuses on a wide array of covers, from Duke Ellington and Thelonious Monk to Tom Waits and Joe Henry. The songs are all linked by Mulvey’s fantastic ability with an acoustic guitar, which seems to be tuned a different way on every song. (His website’s discography lists the tunings for each song, which has no doubt caused many a guitar player to say “wait….what?”)

His original material is fantastic as well, particularly 2007’s solo acoustic Notes From Elsewhere, which best reflects his live performances – witty, insightful songs sung with one of the best voices this side of Leonard Cohen.

 


REVIEW: Heather Maloney - Time & Pocket Change

Make no mistake; we’re HUGE music geeks here at ChunkyGlasses. But even the biggest music geeks can somehow miss something stunning and beautiful, which we did with Heather Maloney’s sophomore album Time & Pocket Change. We won’t hang our heads about it though; we’re too busy basking in the glow of an amazing artist who deserves considerably more attention than she’s currently getting.

Released in April 2011, Time & Pocket Change has been slowly garnering stellar reviews up and down the east coast. Maloney, a New Jersey native, is now based in western Massachusetts and as she tours more frequently from her home base, word of this incredible talent continues to spread. Her voice ranges from powerful yell to playful warble to melted-butter-smooth; her music runs the gamut from sparse and foreboding to crafty and – I’ll use the word again – playful. The songs call to mind any number of other singer-songwriters but she manages to beat them all at their own game; her straight pop songs are constructed better than those of Dar Williams, her introspective songs are more surrealistic and evocative than Kristin Hersh’s, and her creative flourishes (such as a jazzy trumpet on the title track) outshine and are considerably less contrived than those of Regina Spektor.