DAY 6: GRAM PARSONS - GP/GRIEVOUS ANGEL

In less then 24 hours we'll be back in Austin, the land of cold beer and OHMARYMOTHEROFGODTHEBBQISSOGOOD...I mean brisket. In honor of that fact today's installment of Rocktober is going to delve a little bit into the Country catalog...Twangtober if you will

Back when I lived in Richmond I resided in what can best be referred to as a shotgun shack in Southside. It was an old house, probably built in the 40's, had forced air heating, creaky floors, a rickety porch...all of it was "authentic" and I frakking loved it despite, or maybe because of it's brokendown-ness, which somewhat matched my own state at the time. It also had a train behind it. Lot's of trains actually. Trains in the morning, trains at dinner, trains at 4 am...seriously it had trains that were specifically scheduled to frak up my day by plowing through, whistle blaring, every single frakking time I found a moment of peace. 

I hate those trains.

I especially hated though when they got in the way of my listenen' time...which there was a lot of. The great thing about having an old beat down house is that at night you can turn down the lights and all of the old wood just sort of....glows. The floorboards give up a little of all that came before them and a creaky porch lit by only candles with a fan to help the breeze through..well almost nothing is better. I spent a lot of time during these hours just listening to music. All kinds. I can remember the first time I heard "Sky Blue Sky" breezing through the hallway, frequently playing "Neon Bible" so loud that the windows threatened to break, and all of the music that i rediscovered flowing out of 8 (or 10...I'm not sure now) speakers set up to make the whole damn house sound like the worlds most perfect jukebox. What I came back to most was Gram Parsons though. I've always liked a little bit of country, but this was different. It was smart. It was soulful. It was lonely...like me...and it made my little shack the warmest place in the world. It drove out the trains.... in fact they just became a part of the songs as if it was completely natural that they were there and that Gram Parsons himself had summoned them to the studio. It made it all OK. Everything was worth it. It made it all make sense.

To this day I still miss my little house and all that it gave to me, but it's pretty easy to go back there...all I have to do is put on this record.